SUSAN HILL LONG


Susan Hill Long is the author of the middle grade novel Whistle in the Dark (Holiday House, September 2013), about which Publishers Weekly said in its starred review, “…the novel sings with graceful recurring motifs, true emotions, and devastating observations about the beauty that can be found in the darkest hours.” The book was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year and a Bank Street Best Book. In April, 2015, Whistle in the Dark won the Eloise Jarvis McGraw Award for Children's Literature at the Oregon Book Awards.

Susan grew up in New England and attended Bowdoin College. Her books for beginning readers have been published by Macmillan and HarperCollins, and her fiction has appeared in Hunger Mountain. She is the recipient of the Katherine Paterson Prize. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and two daughters, and is currently working on a middle grade novel that will be published by Knopf in 2016.

Praise for The Magic Mirror (2016):

"In a word -- extraordinary. Long's nimble pen dazzles as she leads readers on a madcap chase through a medieval world of magic and merry mayhem. Both heartfelt and hilarious, the tale follows feisty foundling Margaret as she charts a course for truth, finding love and family along the way, and catapults the author into a literary pantheon that includes the likes of Karen Cushman, Terry Pratchett, and Diana Wynne Jones." -- Heather Vogel Frederick

"I love this book, an uproarious, thoughtful, touching, absurd, and altogether splendid adventure about truth, courage, determination, and family. The characters are all delightful and original, and Maggie is a terrifically plucky heroine, but I must admit Bertram and his bagpipe stole my heart. I recommend The Magic Mirror gleefully." -- Karen Cushman

Praise for Whistle in the Dark

“The novel sings with graceful recurring motifs, true emotions, and devastating observations about the beauty that can be found in the darkest hours.” – Publishers Weekly (starred)

“Beautifully crafted historical fiction [that] will appeal to mature readers of all ages.” – Augusta Scattergood, Christian Science Monitor